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EERIE TALES
1919 / Horror
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6.0 / 10
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Directed by Richard Oswald
Written by Robert Liebmann, Edgar Allan Poe and and 3 more...
Starring Anita Berber, Conrad Veidt, Reinhold Schunzel, Hugo Doblin, Paul Morgan and Georg John

After the old-books shop closes, portraits of the Strumpet, Death, and the Devil come to life and amuse themselves by reading stories about themselves, of course, in various guises and eras.

The following tags are associated with this movie: silent, anthology
Eerie Tales (1919)
Review by Michael Mahoney

6 / 10
The first anthology horror movie ever made, Unheimliche Geschichten (known as Eerie Tales, or Uncanny Tales) further cements Germany's domination in the horror genre, but also presents us a mixed bag of uninspiring stories.

Out of the five stories within this anthology (The Apparition, The Hand, The Black Cat, The Suicide Club, and The Spectre), the only one that I really didn't like was the final story, The Spectre, which is based off a poem and has a much more light-hearted feel to it. But that's not to say the other four stories are good - in fact, really, only one story is above average, being The Suicide Club, while the other three are either average or below, being held back by either my perceived unoriginality or too stagy a vibe.

The Apparition is, for the most part, decent, there is a rather spooky vibe to it, and I even like the ending reveal, but it was just lacking additional meat to the story. The Hand was decently well done, but again, there's not much to it. Based on Edgar Allan Poe's short story, The Black Cat was enjoyable to a degree, but just fell short of actually captivating me. The Spectre, which is unfortunately the worst story within and the worst to end the flick on, wasn't my thing whatsoever.

The framing story wasn't amazing, but I'm giving that a break - being the first anthology horror movie (preceding the 1945 classic Dead of Night by 26 years), I don't expect an amazing set up. The actors throughout were okay, but some were prone to overacting even within the silent era of film, which is saying something. Perhaps Conrad Veidt did the best, playing roles in all five stories, along with the framing sequence (something also done by both Reinhold Schunzel and Anita Berber).

Unheimliche Geschichten is a piece of history, and for fans particularly of anthology horror movies, it might be worth a look, but to say that it is occasionally stale, and comes across far more average than you could hope, would be understating it. By no means a bad film, when all is said and done, there are plenty of other silent German films I would recommend before this one.
Other anthology movies that you may enjoy


Creepshow (1982)


Waxworks (1924)


Encounter with the Unknown (1972)


Tales from the Crypt (1972)




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